Vicki Davis

Cool Cat Teacher on Tumblr

Posts tagged school

11 notes &

Books, paper, pencils, pens-
School is back in session again
So many things make a school
But it is how people treat each other that makes it cool.

Filed under school education

5,209 notes &

nprfreshair:

When children’s book writer/illustrator Tomi Ungerer spoke with Fresh Air, he mentioned that he had designed a kindergarten school in the shape of a cat.  This is how he described it:  

"The children go into the mouth every morning. And on the second floor, they can slide down through the tail."

Cats and kittens, here it is. It is in Germany. We want to go back to school. 
photo via apartmenttherapy

Creative school design. Love it. We certainly need it.

nprfreshair:

When children’s book writer/illustrator Tomi Ungerer spoke with Fresh Air, he mentioned that he had designed a kindergarten school in the shape of a cat.  This is how he described it:  

"The children go into the mouth every morning. And on the second floor, they can slide down through the tail."

Cats and kittens, here it is. It is in Germany. We want to go back to school. 

photo via apartmenttherapy

Creative school design. Love it. We certainly need it.

Filed under edreform education school

157 notes &

guardian:

Pictures from The Color Run: the happiest 5km ever 

Dubbed the happiest ‘race’ on the planet, the Color Run is a 5km event in which participants get covered head to foot in powder paint. They start the event dressed in white, but by the end they’re a kaleidoscope of colours having run, danced and walked through four different zones where they’re pelted with vivid cornstarch-based powders. The race started on Olympic Way in north London, then looped around Wembley Stadium, before a truly messy festival finale. After successful events around the world this was the first of four Color Runs to be staged in the UK, with Manchester, Brighton and Belfast still to come.

Photos: Jonny Weeks/the Guardian

Some schools are doing color runs as fundraisers. This looks like a blast and is something to consider.

Filed under fundraising education school running nonprofit

13 notes &

Follow-up Friday: Cell Phones in the Classroom - What

gjmueller:

It’s follow-up-fri and I wanted to share some of the responses.

  • betheteacheryouloved: “very interesting article, particularly because it addresses a population not discussed very often on #Education: adult students…”
  • calebryandavis:I think we should incorporate technology into education more and more as technology grows, instead of running away from it.”
  • itsjusthighschoolman: I’m a freshman in High School, and of my 4 teachers, each one has a different policy…”
  • adventuresinemmaland: “…I am in 3rd grade. I can think of very few reasons for students at this age to have cell phones…”
  • cerulean-tea: School policy is at teacher discretion. I say out of sight until independent work time and only for research.”
  • lhuddles:no unless specifically invited for a task/assignment (a la BYOD)”

Those that “can use”:

  • eninsevil:only allowed to text silently people in the room”
  • ajd92: “I will let them use them for the first 5 minutes and final 5 minutes of class unless we are testing.”
  • aperture-turret:Our school CAN use cellphones however certain websites are blocked and teachers are always on high alert”
  • wildlywandering: In my class, students can use phones to google/wikipedia (but they should ask first..”

Those that “can’t”:

  • crystalofftheclock: School policy, not allowed (in bags only). Confiscated and only parents may pick up from the office — students’ responsibility to inform.”
  • mrsjdr: Not in my 4th grade class. It stays in a locker all day, if out I take it and a parent has to come pick it up from school. Mostly a non-issue.”
  • amiteachingyet:First grade, nope. Losing/breaking/”borrowing” too much of an issue at this age. Had to hold an iPhone Touch today until after school.”
  • littlestwampum: I’m at a Middle School where students turn theirs in during homeroom and they are locked in a closet until the end of the day.”
  • justthatgirlpam: “Turned off and out of sight.”
  • gigifoundatardis: “Our school has a 100% ban on them for middle schoolers while on campus grounds.”
  • memovegacc: “Off”
  • jhwolford: School policy = NO WAY. I look other way if students use to complete work. My desktops in classroom are 10 years old, take 5 min to power on.”
  • vwalker: School rule is zero electronics.”
  • irrationallylogical: Totally unnecessary for my class, thus please keep them stowed away and quiet”

Student opinions:

  • madisonrayeee: I think as long as the teacher is not teaching that we should be alowed to have them out.”
  • edwindrg: Don’t believe it’s respectful to professor or peers”
  • dontjudgemeplz1:If i were a teacher I’d give my students 10 mins at the end of class to use their cell phones because they’re going to use them anyway”
  • isaywhatineedtosay : as long as the students work and pay attention to the teacher i dont see why the students cant use their phones.”
  • aster-e-aster-bunnymund: let kids use them if theyr’e done with their work and during all study halls.”
  • clockwork-minds: I’m a student, but my teachers have a rule where if they catch you on your phone, they can take it and give it back to you the following day.”

A big thanks to those that commented, please know I really appreciate reading your thoughts and getting your perspective.

Filed under Education mlearning mobile phones school edreform teaching

10 notes &

School principals and the rhetoric of ‘instructional leadership’

Great article by Larry Cuban on the Washington Post that you should forward to principals. 

"Yet studies of principal behavior in schools makes clear that spending time in classrooms to observe, monitor, and evaluate classroom lessons do not necessarily lead to better teaching or higher student achievement on standardized tests. Where there is a correlation between principals’ influence on teachers and student performance, it occurs when principals create and sustain an academic ethos in the school, organize instruction across the school, and align school lessons to district standards and standardized test items. There is hardly any positive association between principals walking in and out of classrooms a half-dozen times a day and conferring briefly with teaches about those five-minute visits.The reality of daily principal actions conflicts with the theory."

Filed under education edreform leadership principals administration principal research school improvement school teaching

5 notes &

Google alerts is how we monitor our school brand. We use “Westwood Schools” +Camilla - this way it shows us everything for our school name and in our city. You can deliver to a feed or to email (many like email.) This way it will search and find things and email you when it finds it on the web. Lifehacker has an article on the creative uses for Google Alerts that you should read if it is your job to protect your brand for your business, school, or your own personal brand.
(via Five Creative Uses for Google Alerts)

Google alerts is how we monitor our school brand. We use “Westwood Schools” +Camilla - this way it shows us everything for our school name and in our city. You can deliver to a feed or to email (many like email.) This way it will search and find things and email you when it finds it on the web. Lifehacker has an article on the creative uses for Google Alerts that you should read if it is your job to protect your brand for your business, school, or your own personal brand.

(via Five Creative Uses for Google Alerts)

Filed under social media brand management principal school platform search productivity hacks leadership management

257 notes &

Hug a Teacher Tomorrow « Diane Ravitch's blog

bniche:

According to Diane Ravitch, a teacher in Louisiana posted this on Facebook and I believe this is unbelievably true for many of my colleagues and I:

To parents who are not educators, this may be hard to understand.

Five days a week, we teach your kids.
That means we educate your kids.
Play with your kids.
Discipline your kids.
Joke with your kids.
Console your kids.
Praise your kids.
Question your kids.
Beat our head against a wall about your kids.
Laugh with your kids.
Worry about your kids.
Keep an eye on your kids.
Learn about your kids.
Invest in your kids.
Protect your kids and yes, love your kids.

WE WOULD ALL TAKE A BULLET FOR YOUR KIDS.

It’s nowhere in our job description.
It isn’t covered in the employee handbook.
It isn’t cited in our contracts.
But we would all do it.
So, yes, please hug your kids tonight, really, really tight.

But on Monday, if you see your kids’ teacher, please hug them too.” 

So true, and beautiful.

(via adiemtocarpe)

Filed under education teaching teacher parenting school

42 notes &

Remember the noble fallen, teacher: 4 ways to take action in their honor #newtown

Angela Maiers is right, there is no lesson plan for this. There are children who will not open presents under the tree for them this year because of the senseless tragedy of the lone gunman in Connecticut at Sandy Hook Elementary school. This earth is neither heaven nor hell - but sometimes the face of both show up here. Friday, hell showed his face.

Remember the noble fallen, teachers.

You are a teacher. You are noble.

Why does it take a dumb tragedy for people to realize how dedicated most of you are to your students? You make sacrifices every day and I know that many of you out there would do the same thing for your babies in your classroom.

But you aren’t called to die for your kids. You’re called to live for them and show them how to live.

We grieved as a nation when 9/11 happened, Columbine, Virginia Tech, and we grieve again now - whipped into even more of a frenzy by politicians and a media that are pulling on our heartstrings so that many can do little but cry and hold our babies.

But it is time to loosen our purse strings and make the phone ring to save children alive today who need us. We are teachers, practical people who act. Let’s honor our fallen by SERVING and SAVING kids in their honor.

Teachers stand in the gap.

But we also must remember that there are warm bodied children who will be tucked into their beds tonight because the last task ever done by 6 noble teachers and a principal was to stand in the gap and protect them. These educators gave the ultimate sacrifice to protect the children in their care, like the Great Teacher who did this for us.

We can be shocked and certainly, we can talk about this with others. But if talk is all we do, we’re wasting our breath. There is nothing we can do to bring back these 20 children and 6 teachers. I want to add some perspective here about what we can and should do in honor of these children and educators.

Act to save children now

The death of children is always tragic. All of those hopes and dreams - gone. It is especially tragic if it is senseless and preventable. The leading cause of death of children according to the United States National Insitute of Health is accidents. In 2009, there were 1,314 children killed in automobile accidents (almost 4 a day). One study showed that 72% of cars have their booster seats installed incorrectly. If we look at the CDC stats on the things most likely to kill young children, it remains automobile accidents. It isn’t a crazy gunman we should worry about most, but parents and caregivers who don’t buckle their kids in properly.

Let’s also point out that 6.9 million children die every year, largely due to malnutrition and another report cited by USA today says that 18,000 children die every day of hunger. Even worse, if there could be such a thing, there are an estimated 9 million children in slavery today. (See Free Slaves this Christmas.) Tens of thousands of children have been killed by gunmen in Darfur since the beginning of that genocide in 2004.

But, Vicki, are you marginalizing what happened in Connecticut?

No! Please follow me here. Let’s make these lost lives count to save others.

Teachers stand in the gap

Let’s grieve by giving in honor of our fallen heroes. On Monday, you’re not going to be asked to die for your students, but to live for your students. Let’s channel this grief in the honor of those who are fallen to SAVE lives of children. It is what we should do as teachers.

These teachers used their bodies to protect the children in their care. Let’s use ours to protect the children in ours.

What can we do to honor these fallen teachers?

1- Talk to your students.

Yes, of course, you can talk to and love your students. They will have questions, be there for them. But use this opportunity to talk about something that is a greater threat to them than a gunman — wearing their seatbelt and getting adults to wear them too. We will save more children that way than putting bullet proof glass in the front office. (Larry Ferlazzo has compiled a great list of resources for dealing with tragedy.)

2 - Give donations to organizations that protect children in the name of the fallen teachers.

Donate to Destiny Rescue, a slavery rescue organization, or any worthwhile organization that feeds and helps children. Raise money to help children who need you. Spent your grief honoring these fallen teachers and students by helping children! Write a check and put these six names above on the “in honor of” list.

What greater tribute can be given to a teacher who gave her life sacrificially for her students than to sacrificially give to save another child’s life? Couldn’t we trend the names of these six women on donor lists for worthy organizations around the world?

3 - Schedule a car seat check at your school.

If you want to save the lives of children - work to make sure parents and children are properly secured in their vehicles. Use the empathy of parents in a positive direction for them to realize that senseless accidents are the number one killer of children in the US and how to prevent those. Don’t let this grief be wasted - SAVE LIVES.

4 - Rededicate yourself to your students.

When things like this happen, we see how much these kids really mean to us. Their lives are in our care. This is an incredible responsibility and opportunity. Never settle for even one child to be lost.

Let’s take steps to end the death of children wherever it is happening.

Things went right back to “normal” after 9/11 and in a few weeks, many will move on from this too. But if we can adopt a hungry child - every month we can remember. If we can donate and raise money for causes that help children live healthy lives and do this every year — we can remember.

And more than remembering - we can honor.

So, in honor of these educators, I’m going to go to my classes on Monday and ask them what they want to do in the 3 days we have left to support an organization that helps save the lives of children and we’re going to do it in honor of those who lost their lives at Sandy Hook. I’m going to make a donation in honor of these women to Rescue Atlanta, a nonprofit in Atlanta taking steps to end the child sex trade right here on my door.

Talking, crying, melancholy - throw those tissues away and get busy with your grief - turn your grief into giving and do it in honor of the great ones among us who gave their ultimate gift to their students - their lives.

Remember your noble calling, teacher.

Remember the noble fallen teachers. May we never forget.

Filed under sandy hook elementary tragedy school newtown